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Wordless Wednesday – Foster Dogs Have Changed My Life


I started fostering rescued dogs with Gateway Pet Guardians last April. They have changed my life as much as I’ve changed their lives.

In order of when they came into my life…

Gateway-Pet-Guardians-foster-dogJojo and Sylvie
Named after my wonderful grandparents Joe & Sylvia

Jojo was adopted by a young couple living in their first apartment together. Renamed Toby, he is looking forward to another summer filled with hikes and camping. Sylvie was adopted by a wonderful family with 2 teenagers who spoil her rotten.

Gateway-Pet-Guardians-foster-dogPadme

Padme was adopted by the foster parents who took her in when she was first rescued and helped her find her first adoptive family. When it didn’t work out with that family, she was returned Gateway but since her original fosters were living outside of St. Louis, she came to stay with me. When they moved back, they expressed interest in taking care of her again…and before long they made her a permanent member of their family.

Gateway-Pet-Guardians-foster-dogBenji

Benji was adopted by a PhD student living in a tiny apartment near SLU. Now known as Theo, he goes on lots of walks throughout The Grove and is a regular day care visitor to K9 Athletic Club…where he spent some time after he was first rescued by Gateway learning how to get along with other dogs.

Gateway-Pet-Guardians-foster-dogRomper (photo credit Erica Moler)

Romper was adopted by the mother of my good friend Pamela. Romper, now named Mickey, follows his new mamma around and loves hanging out in his fenced yard in Hermann, MO.

Gateway-Pet-Guardians-foster-dogJodie

Jodie was adopted by a loving couple who created a happy family when they married and gave each of their 5 year old girls a new sister who is the same age. Jodie was overjoyed when she met her family, running from one person to the next as she soaked up the love of 4 people.

Gateway-Pet-Guardians-foster-dogJessica

Jessica was adopted by a friend of my neighbor Cindy. Now known as Lucy, she has a huge house and yard to play in, a couple of kitty siblings and a dog just her size who visits every weekend.

Gateway-Pet-Guardians-foster-dogClemson (but I call him Teddy)

Teddy lived with me for about a month while he was undergoing heart worm treatment. He is now living with another foster parent who plans to adopt him when the treatment is completed.

All of these dogs have such different lives than the ones they would be living if Gateway hadn’t rescued them. All that is stopping us from getting more dogs the lives they deserve is money and foster parents.

How you can help Gateway Pet Guardians

There is always a need for new foster parents who have a dog of their own who would make a good playmate. There is an equally big need for dog lovers who currently don’t have a dog of their own to become foster parents. These people can give a dog that doesn’t get along with other dogs well (yet) a place to thrive.

If you live in the St. Louis region, please join me in working with Gateway. If you live somewhere else, I guarantee the need is just as great in your area. 

 


8 Responses

  1. They are ALL so cute and irresistible! I would love to foster but I’d be afraid I wouldn’t be able to let go!!! Thank you for everything you do!

    • Karen Goodman says:

      You should really give fostering a try. You simply go into it knowing that you aren’t keeping the dog. Your role is to give it a good start on a new life. It also helps if you pick dogs to foster that aren’t exactly what you would pick if you were looking to adopt. When I fostered Jojo and Sylvie, I had absolutely no desire to raise a puppy, but I figured I could easily do a few weeks.

      The same goes with Padme and Teddy. If I was going to adopt, I would want a small dog that is little enough to fly in the cabin of an airplane (which my dog Milo is not!).

      I also think it’s a lot harder to know that there are dogs on the streets or who are on their last days at a shelter than to let a dog go to a good home. Most of us that foster a lot look at every dog leaving as an opportunity to save another. But yes, there are also foster failures who turn into permanent members of the family. But that can only happen if you are willing to consider adopting another dog. I absolutely don’t want 2 dogs of my own at this point in my life, so it makes it easier to let them go.

  2. I’m with Aimee, just don’t think I could let them go after having taken them in, so you are a very special MOM!!

  3. Robyn Wright says:

    They are all so cute Karen! I am amazed at the work you do with these dogs!

  4. Clemson is so adorable(as they all are). I’m just a sucker for chocolate shaggy dogs. We foster too and it’s so much fun. Our 18 year old foster is getting adopted this weekend!

  5. Mark S says:

    Karen,
    As a foster parent for shelter dogs myself I know how hard and how rewarding the experience can be. Our last foster dog, Sebastian, just got adopted to a wonderful family with 2 young children. A day or two after the adoption they sent a picture back to the shelter showing Sebastian sleeping comfortable with their son on the couch. It was great to see Sebastian so relaxed and loved.

  6. Susan says:

    Thank you so much for the difference you’re making in these dogs lives. Both of my baby dogs have been rescues and I can’t imagine their lives or mine if they hadn’t been rescued by some caring person like yourself. Thanks for sharing at Inspire Us Thursday on Organized 31.

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